The Ancient Alien Question (2011) Review

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Anyone who is a fan of Ancient Aliens is familiar with Philip Coppens. The Belgium born author appeared on many episodes. Several were posthumous after his premature death. He died from a rare form of cancer on December 30, 2012. He wrote several books and contributed articles and essays for various publications. A year before his death he published his greatest contribution to alternative history. Or the ancient alien theory. Erich von Daniken’s Chariots of the Gods? might be the most famous book on the subject as it brought these ideas to the mainstream, but Coppens effort is every bit as important.

Coppens launches “a new inquiry into the existence, evidence, and influence of ancient visitors.” He asks The Ancient Alien Question. It is “one small question for man, one giant question for humankind.” Coppens doesn’t stop there. He doesn’t ask the big one and wait for an all-encompassing answer. It wouldn’t be much of a book. He digs deep, questioning everything that could be proof for the ancient alien theory. Much more than that, and to his credit, he tries to answer his questions. His answers are well thought out, and he always tries to show his work. That is, how he arrived at his conclusion.

What sets Coppens apart is that he is both believer and skeptic. I think this is why his book is such a spectacular read. It is why he asks what he asks, and answers the ways he does. Coppens takes nothing at face value. He examines all that is available to him. After careful evaluation, he arrives at what he concludes is the best position. He calls out the skeptics when they need to be. Coppens doesn’t defend everything that is written as proof supporting the ancient alien theory. Zecharia Sitchin has holes poked in his works. He does the same with Robert Temple. Coppens doesn’t play favorites in his search for the answer.

The book is well written, and easy to read. Coppens narrative flows along at a nice pace, neither too quick nor too slow. He doesn’t rant or rave. He maintains his emotions, yet you can feel his passion and enthusiasm. His love for the subject matter shines through on every page as he tries to make sense of it all.

Coppens is neither for nor against one side. His ability to find the faults in both sides’ arguments makes him unique. It is rare when someone pokes holes in both arguments of a subject like this. The majority is all or nothing. Both stances are detrimental in seeking the truth. The truth as they say, lies somewhere in the middle. That is where Coppens looks for it, and that is his true charm.

Copyright © Drew Martin 2015

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